Jeremiah 2:5

Jeremiah 2:5

The Torah describes the false prophet as one who attempts to “make you stray from the path that the Lord your God has commanded you to walk in.” (Deuteronomy 13:6 (5). Instead of listening to the false prophet we are commanded: “The Lord your God shall you follow and Him you shall fear; His commandments you shall observe and to His voice you shall hearken; Him you shall serve and to Him you shall cleave.”

The true prophet will encourage Israel to follow after God – “O House of Jacob: Come let us walk by the light of the Lord!” (Isaiah 2:5). The true prophet encourages fear of the Creator of heaven and earth – “Will you not fear Me? says the Lord; Will you not tremble before Me? For I have set sand as a boundary for the sea, as a permanent law that cannot be broken.” (Jeremiah 5:22). The true prophet encourages observance of God’s commandments that were set down by Moses – “Remember the Torah of Moses My servant which I commanded him at Horeb for all of Israel – decrees and statutes” (Malachi 3:22 [4:4]). The true prophet speaks of hearkening to the voice of God – “…Thus said the Lord, God of Israel: Cursed is the man who will not listen to the words of this covenant that I commanded your forefathers on the day I took them out from the land of Egypt, form the iron crucible saying: Listen to My voice…” (Jeremiah 11:3,4). The true prophet encourages service of God – “Serve the Lord with gladness, come before Him with joyous song” (Psalm 100:2). The true prophet speaks of cleaving to God as the highest ideal – My soul cleaves after You; Your right arm has supported me” (Psalm 63:9).

 

The true prophet knows that God has richly provided for our every need, both spiritual and material. The true prophet recognizes the blessing that is inherent in the law that God has granted to His people and all of the prophet’s words direct us towards the God of Israel and towards the path He set us on when He redeemed us from the house of bondage in a clear and unambiguous way.

 

The false prophet concentrates his attention on the tendency of man that fails to appreciate God’s blessings and that sees God’s law as burdensome and impossible. Instead of encouraging us to recognize the love, the life and the light that is inherent in God’s law; the false prophet claims to offer us a “better path”.

 

The way to resist the persuasions of the false prophet is to ask: Is there anything lacking in the path that God set before us when He took us out of Egypt? Did God not provide for our every need? Did He not shower us with every blessing?

 

By focusing on the blessings that God granted us we will learn to appreciate the holiness of His commandments and the life that is inherent in His law. When we appreciate His love towards us our hearts will be filled with love towards Him – and a heart that is filled with the love of God will not fall for the persuasions of the false prophet (Deuteronomy 13:4 (3).

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Yisroel C. Blumenthal

 

 

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2 Responses to Jeremiah 2:5

  1. Shomer says:

    The Torah describes the false prophet as one who attempts to “make you stray from the path that the Lord your God has commanded you to walk in.” (Deuteronomy 13:6 (5). Instead of listening to the false prophet we are commanded: “The Lord your God shall you follow and Him you shall fear; His commandments you shall observe and to His voice you shall hearken; Him you shall serve and to Him you shall cleave.”

    Now, consider this;
    Rom 10:4 For Christ is the end of the law for righteousness to every one that believeth.

    Here it is pretended that one only must believe in a pagan Christ who is the end of the Jewish Torah. Today, I notice two gospels in the Bible, one gospel is the Torah and the other one is the other gospel of St. Paul.

    Hes 33:16 None of his sins that he hath committed shall be mentioned unto him: he hath done that which is lawful and right; he shall surely live.

    That which is lawful and right, St. Paul declares as expired because of “Christ”. And in order to “confirm” his other gospel, St. Paul declares this;

    Gal 1:8-9 But though we, or an angel from heaven, preach any other gospel unto you than that which we have preached unto you, let him be accursed. 9 As we said before, so say I now again, If any man preach any other gospel unto you than that ye have received, let him be accursed.

    I discovered that St. Paul has brought the other gospel himself and thus he is cursed by his own curse. Who is the false prophet according to Deu 13:6 now?

    On the other hand; The “LORD your GOD” is a Christian phrase which I do not use any longer. Today, I prefer HaShem, ELOHIM, YHVH e. g., even in my mother tongue German. “God” I find in Isa 65:11 Hebr. (Babylonian deity of fortune) and “Lord” sounds too much like “Ba’al”.

    Exo 23:13 And in all things that I have said unto you be circumspect: and make no mention of the name of other gods, neither let it be heard out of thy mouth.

  2. Shomer says:

    Hi Richard
    This is Roman Catholic indoctrination. Today, I agree no more. Jesus Christ is a carven idol, and Christianity is sin, that’s it! Your “New Testament” was presentet you by the devil and if you liked some proof, I’ld like to share it with you. The key names are the Roman Catholic Saint St. Paul and the Roman Cesar Constantine (Pontifex Maximus) – just a hint to think about.
    Shomer

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